Everything you Need to Know about Yogarun

15th June 2019
Yoga and running are supposed to be completely opposite activities. But yogarun is a new discipline that's becoming very popular all over the world.

Yoga and running are supposed to be completely opposite activities. But, there’s a new discipline that’s becoming more and more popular all over the world. We’re talking about yogarun. Would you like to learn more about it? You’ll find everything you need to know in this article.

Combining yoga and running

In theory, yoga is a slow and relaxing activity. People practice yoga in a ‘zen’ space, silently or with instrumental music. On the other hand, while running is a sport that some people consider to be relaxing, it involves fast and active movements.

How is it possible to combine them? There are several different routines for yoga enthusiasts who want to start running or runners who want to experience the benefits of yoga.

To start, you must include three yoga sessions per week. However, you shouldn’t do just any type of yoga. Focus on the types that promote effort and endurance such as Ashtanga, Baptiste, Vinyasa flow or Power yoga. Doing Hatha yoga is not very useful in this scenario.

On top of that, if you’re training to run a marathon, you must add three running sessions that last between 40 to 60 minutes each. A good plan would be to practice yoga on Monday, Wednesday and Friday, and running on Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday (or vice versa).

Don’t forget to include a rest day -Sunday, to do stretches and relaxation exercises after each weekly session. You must also sleep for eight hours straight every night. This way, your body will recover properly, and you won’t overload your muscles.

Yoga + running = yogarun

It’s possible to go beyond doing yoga and running in the same week as separate activities. You can also combine both activities and enjoy them in one single session. How is this possible? By practicing this new discipline: yogarun.

The combination of these two sports has turned into a unique and new discipline, that allows you to find the balance between your mind and body. It’s based on breathing, posture, awareness, and power. You’ll be able to maximize your training and get the most out of the sessions!

Woman getting ready for a Yogarun class

Yoga enthusiasts can test their breathing and physical abilities. Runners, on the other hand, have the possibility of improving their warm ups, strengthening their joints, caring for their back and administrating their breath better, both during a race and in everyday life.

If you’ve never done yoga or running, it doesn’t matter! This is the best option to work out. Yogarun is a new fitness combination that’s causing a sensation in Europe and America. It’s a very interesting fusion that you should definitely try.

A yogarun class consists of different circuits or stations. In those circuits, participants work on their strength, racing technique, and endurance. Then, they perform stretches and balance exercises.

At the end, they do a regular yoga class. In most cases, the classes take place in the open air -such as in a park- but you can also practice it at the gym or at home.

Doing yogarun

If you’re interested in the idea of running and doing yoga at the same time, we recommend trying a yogarun class. If you’re a runner, you can benefit from learning some traditional yoga postures, as they’ll also improve your endurance and strength when running. For example, these are some of the poses that stand out the most:

1. Pigeon pose

Place both of your knees on the floor and bring your right knee forward, in between your arms. Stretch your left leg backward. Then, balance your body and place your hands on the sides of your right leg. Keep your back straight at all times and your head looking forward.

Woman in the pigeon pose for a Yogarun class

2. Ardha Matsyendrasana

Sit down with your legs stretched in front of you. Then, flex your right leg and cross it over your left leg. The idea is for your right foot to touch the outer side of your left knee.

After that, turn your torso to the left and place that same hand behind your back to support your body. Emphasize the pose by bringing your right elbow over your right knee.

Woman doing the Ardha Matsyendrasana pose

3. Butterfly pose

It’s very simple to perform: sit with your back straight and bend your knees so that the soles of your feet are touching in front of your body. Use your arms to press down on your legs.

Woman doing the butterfly pose for a Yogarun class

In a nutshell, in addition to being incredibly beneficial, yogarun is a fun activity as well. You can practice it on your own or with a partner. Don’t hesitate to try this increasingly popular discipline!

  • Ross, A., & Thomas, S. (2010). The Health Benefits of Yoga and Exercise: A Review of Comparison Studies. The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine. https://doi.org/10.1089/acm.2009.0044