How Supplements Affect our Bodies

· 26th February 2019
The ages of people who consume supplements ranges between 17 and 30 years. More men than women are choosing to use supplements with the aim of exhibiting a more muscular and “ripped” body.

If you started working out in the gym, those brightly labeled bottles displayed in the reception area or at the entrance of the establishment probably caught your attention. They are very popular among bodybuilders and these supplements affect our bodies in different ways. How? We’ll tell you in this article!

Sports supplements: are they necessary?

This question has different answers, depending on who it’s addressed to. On one hand, we find the loyal defenders of these “magical” powders or tablets—especially those who dedicate themselves to lifting weights. On the other hand, we have people who claim that they’re a problem rather than a solution, due to their multiple side effects.

In many cases, people don’t consider the doses or ingredients when ingesting these types of products. An incorrect intake—excessive or deficient—can bring about several health problems.

It's important to follow the instructions in the labels of supplement containers.

In fact, they can become an addiction: ceasing to use these supplements causes your body to “start from scratch” and it seems like you were never even able to lift a two-pound barbel in your life!

Although, it’s necessary to be serious since the side effects of these types of products can be irreversible. Such as kidney failure (which requires dialysis or hemodialysis in the future), liver problems (because it can’t process the substances that it receives), or sexual dysfunctions.

Supplements and proteins: do they cause more benefit or harm?

Proteins are one of the options we have available within sports supplements—they are also one of the most consumed. Their usual presentation is in tablet form, although, you can also ingest them as shakes. In the latter case, people can use them as snacks or drink them before or after their workout. They come in different flavors, such as strawberry, vanilla, chocolate, etc.

Basically, proteins take action in our bodies by generating tissue, helping muscle mass growth, and reducing fat or adipose tissue. However, not everything is “peachy” as the saying goes because these supplements can cause hypertrophy in muscle cells due to abnormal muscle growth.

Is ingesting this type of protein the only option to becoming muscular? The specialists indicate that it isn’t, as we can find this nutrient in common foods. Chicken breast is the clearest example.

The point about consuming natural proteins (or at least not 100 percent artificial) is that the results take time to arrive and are almost ephemeral. On the other hand, those who take supplements notice the difference after a few days. Although, you have to take shakes or pills every day in order to maintain the effects.

Whey proteins—extracted from milk serum—and branched amino acids are common among athletes. They allow muscle mass to recuperate and form. The biggest problem with both supplements is that they contain contaminated ingredients. That is to say, dopant or dangerous substances such as fibrin, which stimulates the central nervous system.

Some supplements contain dangerous substances, such as fibrin.

The risks of supplements

Even if you hear otherwise, sports supplements in the form of shakes or pills are risky for your health. Mainly at the renal, cardiovascular, and bone levels. With their intake, uric acid increases, the liver, and kidneys don’t perform their functions properly, the body develops toxins, and blood vessels receive damage (irreversible in many cases).

That’s not all, you can experience renal, hepatic, and blood overloads, hypertension, and tachycardia. Myocardial infarctions become frequent at an early age. Moreover, there are alterations in the protein matrix of the bones and this leads to decalcification and a greater propensity to fractures and fissures. 

If you’re thinking about taking sports supplements because you’ve seen them in the gym or someone you know ingests them, we recommend you consult a doctor or a nutritionist beforehand.