The Unbreakable 6 – 0 Handball Defense Strategy

1st February 2019
Every sport has different strategies for defending and attacking. This is what makes them so unique and exciting. Here are the handball defense strategies that are most used in this sport.

We can all learn from the different sports strategies and analyze them, they aren’t exclusively for players. This article will explain the main characteristics of one of these strategies used in handball, the 6 – 0 defense strategy.

Defense in handball

This sport is one of the most viewed, due to its fast pace, adrenaline, and of course, its strategies. The offense and defense are the two parts of this sport and the teams are made up of six field players and one keeper.

In defense, there are different approaches differing from the 6 – 0 defense strategy, which we will describe later. The teams must build their strategies depending on the strength of their players or the situation in the game.

The best offense is having a good defense. If the team protects their court well, they can steal or intercept the ball easily and attempt a counter-attack. Thus, the different types of defense in handball are:

  • 5 – 1 defense
  • 4 – 2 defense
  • 3 – 3 defense
  • 3 – 2 – 1 defense
  • 6 – 0 defense

5 – 1 defense strategy

The first player, the one who is most forward, can move in any direction. He starts to vary his position depending on the rivals’ actions. Once the ball is intercepted by his teammates, he will immediately get the pass for the counter-attack.

Additionally, this player must prevent the opponents from getting the ball, maintaining a “closed” defense.

The defense strategy is also the best offense strategy

4 – 2 defense strategy

This strategy is quite similar to the previous one, with the difference that you have two forward players. And so, this is a good defense strategy to intimidate the opponents.

The disadvantage of this strategy is that there are certain holes in the defense that the rival can take advantage of. Often, a 4 – 2 defense strategy can easily jump to a 5 – 1 in the same play.

3 – 3 defense strategy

This consists of forming two defensive lines with three players each. The only problem with this defense strategy is that if the first line is broken, the second one is weaker, as there are only three players.

3 – 2 – 1 defense strategy

This is one of the most complicated defense systems since the players must form three parallel lines. The closest line to the goal has three players, the next line has two and the last line has one player. It’s like a triangle.

This formation requires extensive training and understanding among the teammates since they must move as one.

The 6 – 0 defense strategy: unpenetrable wall

All defense strategies have two main objectives: to prevent the opponents from scoring, and at the same time, ensuring the ball executes a counter-attack. You may be thinking that the 6 – 0 strategy only satisfies the first goal. Then, why is it the most common strategy in handball?

This “closed” defense formation consists of having all six field players in one defensive line, in front of the 6-meter line. Thus, forcing the opposite team to shoot from afar, that is if they’re able to make it past the line of defense.

The 6 - 0 defense strategy forces a shot from far

How does it work?

Despite its effectiveness, this defense strategy isn’t flawless and there are always weaknesses in the formation. However, you can avoid these flaws with certain movements from the defensive players.

Although this mechanism does form a six-player wall, they are not standing like statues. The position that they take is relative to one another and can have great influence on the strength of this defense strategy. The players can move closer to each other or further away, moving in blocks or walls.

Lastly, it’s important to know that the 6 – 0 defense strategy is adjustable depending on the situation in the game. It can easily transform into any other strategy during the same play. However, distraction is the only thing this defense strategy doesn’t allow for during its execution.

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