Be Careful with Miracle Diets

· 14th March 2019
Miracle diets can be dangerous for your body. Do you take the necessary precautions to ensure your well being with the food you consume?

Miracle diets are known for promising quick, effective results while being nearly effortless. This is what leads a lot of people to use them to reach their ideal weight. What they may not know is that this type of weight loss plan may be extremely harmful to the body.

Next, we’ll explain what the main risks are that these miracle diets carry. In case you want to follow one of these diets, you need to keep in mind from the first moment that they are not your best option. This is why they should not be followed for too long.

Besides, any change in your eating habits, such as a diet, must be supervised by a professional. A professional will show you the right steps to take to reach your ideal weight without putting your health at risk.

Rebound effect

The main problem with miracle diets is the rebound effect. This means that after concluding these diets, you tend to regain the weight you lost. Furthermore, in most cases, the weight you recover is greater than the weight you lost in the first place. This will be a major set back for your weight loss goals.

woman with scale in hand

This is mainly due to the fact that your body works in the same way as a storeroom; it has a memory. Explained in a simple way, what occurs is as follows: when you follow a miracle diet, you’re taking in very small amounts of nutrients. This is why your body must use its reserves in order to function.

Once the miracle diet is over, and food intake is back to normal, the body “remembers” it has gone through a period of shortage or survival. It’s then that it prepares for a possible new and similar situation. It stores mostly fat and other nutrients in order to be able to face another possible nutrient shortage.

Mood swings in miracle diets

While you are on a miracle diet, it’s usual to have mood swings. These are the consequence of hunger and fatigue.

You need to keep in mind that you are not providing your body with all the nutrients it needs. Therefore you feel weak, tired and lacking in energy.

Besides, once you have finished the diet, if the rebound occurs, new feelings appear, such as low self-esteem and failure. Your nourishment is closely related to your character, your miracle diet will hardly keep you in a good mood.

Bad eating habits

As we have said before on many occasions, habits are essential to achieving any goal we set. The right habits will allow us to reach our goals because the key is to keep a positive attitude at all times.

On the other hand, miracle diets do exactly the opposite. The habits they create are totally unhealthy and may be very harmful to your health. Some of the routines they propose may include skipping a meal, drinking an excessive amount of liquids or generating a shortage of nutrients.

empty dishwater

Lack of nutrients

Most miracle diets focus on one type of food or a group pf foods. They exclude the rest that must not be eaten if the desired results are to be obtained.

Some examples of these weight loss plans are the artichoke diet or the the baby food diet. These are insane ways to lose weight and will definitely never produce the results we hope for. What they do for sure is provoke a lack of nutrients in our body.

Not consuming a specific group of foods may lead to serious consequences such as anemia, low blood pressure, sugar or dizziness.

In conclusion, miracle diets should never be an option if you want to reach an ideal weight and stay that way for a long time. And, as we have said before, there are no magical formulas as miracle diets want us to believe.

The only road to achieving this goal is a balanced and healthy diet and exercising regularly. To help you out we have suggested some healthy dinner options for you to lose weight in a safe, effective way.

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