Pros and Cons of Working Out at the Gym

26th April 2019
More and more fitness fans are deciding to sign up at the gym to get or stay toned. Below, discover what the pros and cons are of working out at the gym. 

Many people who decide to get in shape choose to do so at the gym because of the convenience and infinite possibilities of exercises you can do there. Keep in mind that when you choose the gym, you’re opting to exclude many other types of exercises such as running or swimming.

In this article, we’re going to review the pros and cons of working out at the gym.

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Wherever you may live, you surely have an infinite number of gyms near your home where you can sign up as a member. Gyms are a meeting place for fitness fans who want to workout. No matter the weather conditions or time of day, you can work out at the gym.

Gyms are full of strength training machines and the best cardio machines with the latest technology. As a result, almost everyone can adapt their workout at the gym to their fitness goals.

Training at the gym allows you to tone your muscles, helps you lose weight, and helps many people feel much better. If that weren’t enough, doing regular strength training or endurance exercises also helps prevent the natural loss of muscle mass, which tends to happen with age.

Likewise, these exercises help improve your balance, coordination, and posture. All the while, the different cardio machines will allow you to prepare for whatever kind of fitness competition you’d like to participate in.

Unfortunately, not everything about working out at the gym is perfect. In a moment, we’ll talk about the pros and cons of training at the gym. Make sure you consider all the positive and negative aspects we’re about to mention before deciding either way.

The pros of working out at the gym

1. The equipment that’s available

Signing up as a member at your local gym will allow you access to a variety of high-quality machines and workout equipment. From weight machines and dumbbells to elliptical machines, the gym has everything you need to get in shape.

At the gym, you can quickly change from one machine to another, which gives your workout more flexibility. If you’re easily bored while running on the treadmill, you can switch to the stationary bike or use the elliptical machine. All of this can happen during just one session at the gym.

Additionally, if you’d like to work out certain muscle groups specifically, the gym is full of weight training machines and dumbbells that you can use to do just this.

Woman using seated row machine at the gym

2. It reduces stress

Stress has an enormously negative effect on the body. It can be caused by many different factors, be it work, family, or simply your daily routine. However, lifting weights or doing some cardio could be a solution to problems that are generating stress.

Going to the gym to work out may help you forget about your problems and release some endorphins. Just like with any type of exercise, working out at the gym will help you feel much happier. In addition, exercise will help raise your self-confidence.

3. Professionals at your disposal

All gyms make professional trainers available to you to offer an assessment of your physical condition and help suggest exercises you can do. Having professional help available is always welcome when you want to increase the amount of weight you’re lifting or want to create new fitness goals.

A qualified personal trainer will understand how to motivate you and will make sure every workout is a rewarding and fun experience for you. Trainers not only offer advice about workout routines but they can also help you start or follow a healthy diet.

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4. Classes at the gym

Fitness classes are a great way to socialize and burn calories all at the same time. They can be really fun and help create a structured environment for you.

This will allow fitness fans to learn something new together with their classmates. This way, you can achieve your fitness goals by dancing ballet or doing yoga or kickboxing.

Woman teaching a zumba fitness dance class at the gym

The cons of working out at the gym

1. Less free time

For many people, working out at home is the only practical option. This is due to many different factors such as lack of time, the cost of a gym membership, or both.

The reality is that many fitness fans simply prefer to work out in their own home to save time and money or simply have some time and space for themselves.

2. Price

While not all gyms charge a hefty membership fee, sometimes being a member of a gym can be a big money drain. Whatever the case may be, keep in mind that if you’re going to the gym regularly, you’re definitely getting your money’s worth out of the monthly fee.

3. The crowds of people

Another negative aspect of going to the gym is that they might be quite crowded at the times you can get to the gym. As a result, you may end up having to wait to use certain machines and you’ll feel pressured to finish your exercise in order to allow other people to use the equipment.

Unfortunately, there are only two solutions to this problem: you can either change your schedule to go to the gym when it’s less crowded or you can use the machines that are free at that moment. This conflict can cause some fitness lovers to lose their patience.

Woman resting in the middle of her workout

Once you’ve had a chance to analyze the pros and cons of working out at the gym, it’s time to decide whether it’s worth investing your time and money in order to become a member at one.

Whatever your case may be, we’ll always recommend that you choose a gym that can satisfy your needs. What’s your decision going to be?

  • Kapperman, G., & Kapperman, G. A. (2017). You are your own gym. British Journal of Visual Impairment, 35(2), 178–180. https://doi.org/10.1177/0264619616685375
  • Doğan, C. (2015). Training at the Gym, Training for Life: Creating Better Versions of the Self Through Exercise. Europe’s Journal of Psychology, 11(3), 442–458. https://doi.org/10.5964/ejop.v11i3.951